Concerns about umbilical cord clamping
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Contact: Eileen Nicole Simon
eileen4brainresearch@yahoo.com
Topics
Evidence
versus opinion
Increased prevalence
of childhood disorders
Dependency and
need for lifelong care
Factors in need of
closer examination
References
<<
>>
prenatal exposure to maternal stress hormones, food additives (coloring and
preservatives), carbon monoxide and other fumes from second-hand smoke, toxic
pollutants like PCBs, prenatal infections like rubella, HIV (and formerly syphilis), food
allergens like gluten and lactose, hypoglycemia, and hyperglycemia.
Shouldn't the essential and continuous need for oxygen also be on this list?  The
evidence is clear, from experiments with monkeys asphyxiated at birth, that the
brainstem nuclei of high metabolic rate sustain injury.  With time the effect of early
brainstem impairment (which some dismiss as minimal) becomes far more
widespread [
68].
e) A connection should be considered between the greater vulnerability of male
infants to complications at birth and the greater numbers of male children who are
afflicted with developmental disorders [90-93].  I hold music appreciation groups at
work; I take patient requests and create CDs that are compilations of these requests.  
At Christmas time one patient requested Harry Belafonte's "Mary's Boy Child."  As we
listened to this song I looked at the men (prison inmates) around the table and
realized each and every one was once someone's much desired boy child.  Our
prisons hold large numbers of, mostly men, many who were also cognitively and
behaviorally disturbed from early childhood; the evidence is in their medical charts
and offender records.
f) Mahffey and Rossdale in 1957 and 1959 described the frequent disaster of
umbilical cord clamping during the assisted birth of thoroughbred foals.  The newborn
foals often developed a convulsive disorder or appeared to have an autistic-like lack
of awareness even of their own mother [
22, 94].  Mary, who gave birth to her boy child
in a stable, without expert assistance and perhaps with nothing to tie off the cord,
does serve as our best role-model.
Posted: February 27, 2006
(a work in progress)
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