Concerns about umbilical cord clamping
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Contact: Eileen Nicole Simon
eileen4brainresearch@yahoo.com
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Waiting for the first breath,
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"When respiration is established, let the infant rest on the bed between the thighs of the
mother, preferably on its right side or back, avoiding contact with the discharges, while the
navel string is attended to.  No haste is necessary in tying and cutting the cord, unless
relaxation of the uterus, flooding, or some other condition of the mother, requires immediate
attention from the physician." – King 1907, pp260-261 [
41].
"As soon as the child is born, its eyes are wiped, any mucus in the air passages is removed,
and it is placed in a convenient position between the patient's legs.  The cord is tied as soon as
it has stopped pulsating, and the infant is then removed." – Jellett 1910, p 350 [
42].
"Normally the cord should not be ligated until it has ceased to pulsate…" – Williams 1917, pp
342-343 [
43].
"… A compromise is usually adopted, in that the cord is not tied immediately after birth, nor
does one wait till the expression of the placenta, but only until the cessation of pulsation in the
cord, an average of five to ten minutes." – vonReuss 1921, p 419 [
44].
"After waiting until the pulsation in the exposed umbilical cord has perceptibly weakened or
disappeared, the child is severed from its mother." – DeLee 1930, p330 [
45].
"In most clinics the cord is not tied until pulsation has ceased." – Curtis 1933, p 828 [46].
"…If the infant has cried and has respired well for about five minutes, there is no advantage in
leaving at attached any longer to the placenta." – FitzGibbon 1937, p 128 [
47].
"As soon as respiration is well established, lay the child on the bed on its side.  Wait for a few
minutes until the cord shows signs of ceasing to pulsate…" – Johnstone 1949, p 190 [
48].
Posted: February 27, 2006
(a work in progress)
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